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3D-Printed Housing Underway in Greeley

Developers in public-private partnership expect 174 concrete-based homes by 2029.

ColoradoBiz Staff //June 12, 2024//

3D-Printed Housing Underway in Greeley

Developers in public-private partnership expect 174 concrete-based homes by 2029.

ColoradoBiz Staff //June 12, 2024//

The “printing” of walls for a Northern Colorado housing development got underway May 30, as Alquist 3D, a pioneering firm in 3D construction printing, began construction on the first of four prototype units of the Hope Springs housing development in Greeley.

Developers of Hope Springs, a project of Greeley-Weld Habitat for Humanity, expect to have 174 homes completed by 2029.

Alquist 3D moved its headquarters from Iowa City, Iowa, to Greeley in October last year. Founded in 2020, the company uses a colossal 3D printer to build concrete-based homes. The printer creates layers on top of layers of material, eventually building full walls. These can range from single-family units to entire structures across a range of prices and sizes. The company created the first owner-occupied printed home in 2021 using patented material.

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Hope Springs is designed to be affordable, water-wise, and climate-friendly, serving as a model for similar developments across the nation. Plans for the community include amenities such as on-site childcare facilities, walking and biking trails, a nature discovery park, and mini-pitch LED soccer fields.

Under a public-private partnership, Alquist 3D is receiving over $4 million in support and incentives from Greeley and the state with the intent of transforming the region into the epicenter of high-tech 3D home and infrastructure printing.

The state is providing a $1,097,242 Job Growth Incentive Tax Credit over eight years for the creation of up to 79 net new jobs, as well as a Strategic Fund Incentive for $335,000 over a five-year period for the creation of up to 67 net new jobs.

Greeley is investing $2.85 million. Greeley’s funding includes an upfront forgivable loan, which was contingent on Alquist’s relocation of its headquarters to the city and the company’s commitment to stay at least five years. The city is also helping Alquist with $100,000 of its relocation expenses. The largest portion of the city’s incentive package, $2 million, is tied to Alquist’s purchase of equipment, staffing and construction in Greeley.

The partnership also involves close collaboration with Aims Community College to train students and create an economic ecosystem with an emphasis on innovation and workforce development.

“There is nowhere else on the planet where so much is happening all in one place to move structural 3D printing forward,” Alquist founder and Chairman Zachary Mannheimer said.

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